What is eczema? All You need to know about eczema

Eczema is a skin condition that affects the skin around the lips and mouth. Eczema is also known as atopic dermatitis or atopic eczema. It occurs when there is an overproduction of a particular type of skin cells called eosinophils. The body produces too many eosinophils, which can lead to allergic reactions such as eczema.

The term “eczema” is from Greek “ekzema”, from “ekzein” (to boil) + “akouein” (to boil). The term is derived from the fact that it is a skin condition that results in small blisters or vesicles. It was first described in 1776 by German physician Samuel Thomas von Sömmering, who called it “Eczematous eruption”.

The term “eczema” is now used in the English language to refer to atopic dermatitis, a similar condition seen in people who are allergic to certain substances.

The causes of eczema are not well understood, but it is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The cause of eczema may not be obvious, as some people with severe eczema have no family history of the condition.

There are several types of eczema, including:

Atopic dermatitis (eczema) — This form occurs most often in children and young adults and affects the face, neck, hands, feet and genital areas. Atopic dermatitis is more common in those with asthma or hay fever than in other people.

It can occur at any age but most commonly begins between ages 2 and 5 years old and less commonly between ages 6 months to 5 years old. Atopic dermatitis has no known cause or cure but can be treated with medicine to relieve symptoms such as itching and redness on the skin.

A combination of topical corticosteroids plus antihistamines may also help reduce symptoms in some cases. For milder forms of this type of eczema (sometimes called atopic dermatitis), the doctor may recommend using an over-the-counter cream or lotion to treat the skin. People with atopic dermatitis should avoid certain foods such as eggs, milk, certain fish and peanuts.

This form occurs most often in children and young adults and affects the face, neck, hands, feet and genital areas. Atopic dermatitis is more common in those with asthma or hay fever than in other people. It can occur at any age but most commonly begins between ages 2 and 5 years old and less commonly between ages 6 months to 5 years old.

Atopic dermatitis has no known cause or cure but can be treated with medicine to relieve symptoms such as itching and redness on the skin. A combination of topical corticosteroids plus antihistamines may also help reduce symptoms in some cases. For milder forms of this type of eczema (sometimes called atopic dermatitis), the doctor may recommend using an over-the-counter cream or lotion to treat the skin.

People with atopic dermatitis should avoid certain foods such as eggs, milk, certain fish and peanuts. Eczema herpeticum — Also known as eczema herpetiformis , this form of eczema occurs more often in adults than children. It occurs when there is a specific type of herpes virus that causes eczema on specific areas of the body like arms and legs that are not normally affected by this condition (e.g. the hands and feet). It is more common in adults over the age of 40 years who have had recurrent herpes infections such as cold sores or genital herpes.

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Also known as , this form of eczema occurs more often in adults than children. It occurs when there is a specific type of herpes virus that causes eczema on specific areas of the body like arms and legs that are not normally affected by this condition (e.g. the hands and feet). It is more common in adults over the age of 40 years who have had recurrent herpes infections such as cold sores or genital herpes.

Eczema vulvovaginalis — This form affects women younger than men and is characterized by a rash on the vulva (the external female genitalia) and sometimes on other parts of the body including between the legs, buttocks and abdomen.

This form affects women younger than men and is characterized by a rash on the vulva (the external female genitalia) and sometimes on other parts of the body including between the legs, buttocks and abdomen.

Eczema-like conditions — There are several types of eczema that resemble atopic dermatitis but do not involve itching or redness on skin, especially those caused by irritants like dust mite allergens or certain chemicals found in cosmetics, shampoos or soaps (e.g., fragrances). These types include contact dermatitis , food allergy/sensitivity , neurodermatitis and urticaria.

There are several types of eczema that resemble atopic dermatitis but do not involve itching or redness on skin, especially those caused by irritants like dust mite allergens or certain chemicals found in cosmetics, shampoos or soaps (e.g., fragrances).

These types include , , and Urticaria — This is a type of allergic skin reaction that causes a rash with itchy welts or hives (raised bumps) and symptoms such as swelling, itchiness, redness and sometimes fever. Urticaria is also known as hives or nettle rash .

This is a type of allergic skin reaction that causes a rash with itchy welts or hives (raised bumps) and symptoms such as swelling, itchiness, redness and sometimes fever. Urticaria is also known as . Pruritus — This type of itching affects the skin at all times rather than just when the skin is in contact with an irritant. Itching can be intense and can cause inflammation of the affected area.

Pruritus often occurs in conjunction with other allergic symptoms such as sneezing and coughing. If pruritus persists for more than two weeks after you stop being exposed to the irritant that causes it, your doctor may need to consider other possible causes for your condition including medication side effects or other medical conditions like asthma.

Eczema is the most common form of dermatitis in children. It can occur at any age but is most common between the ages of two and six years. It occurs most often in children who have one or more family members with atopic dermatitis. It also occurs more often in girls than boys, probably because it affects the skin more than any other part of the body, and girls tend to be more sensitive to irritants than boys.

Eczema is not contagious and cannot be passed from person to person. If a child has eczema, he or she can have it as long as he or she lives, although it may get better later in life for some people. It is not known for certain why eczema occurs.

It is thought that some people are born with an allergic reaction to something in the environment that they come into contact with, such as the substances in soap, detergents, or laundry detergents that cause dermatitis. In some cases, it may be caused by a food allergy. Eczema may also develop as a result of infection with bacteria or viruses.

Eczema may occur in any part of the body but most often appears on the hands, face and elbows. It can affect all skin types (normal and oily), but usually affects oily skin more than normal skin. The affected area may itch, burn or become red and swollen. The skin can become dry and rough and sometimes it may crack or peel off in small pieces. Itching of the affected area can be intense and unbearable, especially when it is exposed to water or other irritants such as soaps or detergents.

Eczema tends to occur in families where there has been a history of atopic dermatitis (eczema) among close relatives including siblings, parents and grandparents. If you have had eczema before you might have a family history of atopic dermatitis (eczema) if one or more family members had eczematous rash at least twice before their 40th birthday . You might also have a family history of hay fever

Conclusion

Eczema is a chronic, relapsing condition that is often associated with allergies. It is characterized by a chronic, itchy skin rash. The severity and location of the rash can vary significantly between individuals. Clinical trials have shown that topical steroids are effective in treating eczema, but they should be used only under the supervision of a physician as they may cause serious side effects.

6 Facts About Eczema

  1. The term eczema is used to describe both simple and complex atopic dermatitis.
  2. Eczema can affect any area on the skin.
  3. Eczema may occur in any part of the body, but it most often appears on the hands, face and elbows.
  4. The severity and duration of itching can vary significantly between individuals. In some cases, eczema may only be mild, while in others it can be severe and chronic.
  5. Eczema usually appears on the hands and feet but it may also appear on the face, trunk or arms.
  6. Eczema is not contagious; however, there is a possibility that you might have an allergic reaction to something

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